Sweet Stuff


gravi-teamfalls:

robertryancory:

Gravity Falls; Sock Opera Rough Designs

Sorry for the delay, back from vacation.
Somebody figured out that Bipper in the Reverend outfit was inspired by Robert Mitchum in Night of the Hunter. That’s my favorite movie and a big influence on many artist I know. There are other secrets hidden in the designs though…

Bill pays Dipper a visit- Original special poses and designs by master of nightmares Robert Ryan Cory!

Bipper’s outfit inspired by this dashing gent: 

http://theredlist.com/media/database/settings/cinema/1950-1960/the-night-of-the-hunter/006-the-night-of-the-hunter-theredlist.jpg

— 2 days ago with 10827 notes

leseanthomas:

Ms. Shawna Mills, aka LazyMills has been on my radar for some time. Hailing from my hometown of NYC, the soft spoken 2D animator/concept designer’s work does a lot of the talking with it’s loud, boisterous and “IDGAF” treatment to shape laws and rules. She’s one of my favorite people working and she’s one of the few ladies of color in animation who has their own voice. 

Source:  Lazymills.com

(via atroxchobatsu)

— 5 days ago with 7663 notes

nayrosartrefs:

Some awesome leg tutorials done by n3m0s1s.

(via scotty6000)

— 6 days ago with 51127 notes

ani-r:

Let’s talk about trees - a practical how-to for populating your natural environments and landscapes with trees and plantlife in drawings

I’ve seen a lot of people who really want to do nature/landscape drawings but struggle with filling the space. I’m by no means an authority on this matter, but I thought I’d share my observations and ideas about filling nature shots with cool stuff because I really like drawing them and spend a lot of time doing it.

Some observations:

  • It’s hard to figure out what’s in a natural landscape unless you take time and really make a mental inventory of everything you see. Go explore and memorize
  • Draw from life and references
  • It’s too easy to fall into the habit of making ‘convenient shapes’ with trees and branches. Look for alternatives, examine how abruptly branches grow into different directions and split.
  • Mix and match. I never draw a scientifically exact tree species, I mix the relevant qualities from the kinds of trees I know that fit the image. Combine stuff you’ve seen and your imagination.
  • I try to ‘layer’ the vegetation. A forest looks empty with just trees. Think about the medium and low-height vegetation and bushes and then what’s closest to the ground and ON the ground.
  • Take into account what you want to convey with the vegetation; seasons, is the environment lush or harsh, is it creepy or idyllic?

If you like this, please do reblog but do not redistribute/reupload or modify in any way without my written consent.

— 6 days ago with 451 notes